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COVID-19


  • Trump: Superhero or Superspreader?

    by Meredith Martin, Gillian Weiss and Bonnie Siegler

    Inspired by the Sun King’s detractors, the White House Gift Shop’s self-parodying statements, and Trump’s own Superman fantasies, we offer a medal honoring the Super Spreader.



  • What Fans of "Herd Immunity" Don't Tell You

    by John M. Barry

    Prolonged isolation measures to fight COVID-19 do cause harm--social, emotional, and economic. But advocates of "herd immunity" are not offering a practical or safe plan to protect the vulnerable if the virus spreads on a mass scale. 



  • In Fights Over Face Masks, Echoes of the American Seatbelt Wars

    The fight over seatbelt laws in the United States was fraught with trying to strike a balance between individual and public interests. Those concerns have also been reflected in similar matters of health and safety, including vaccinations, helmet laws — and masks.


  • Fear of the "Pussification" of America: A Short Cultural History

    by Gregory A. Daddis

    The bizarre idea that COVID-19 can be defeated through manliness is one of the stranger cultural themes of our time, but it connects to a long history of anxiety about masculinity in a changing America that encourages violent and even self-destructive actions in the name of proving virility.


  • An Open Letter to Dr. Anthony Fauci

    by Martin Halpern

    A history professor who also has a background in public health research urges Dr. Anthony Fauci to resign so that he can freely speak out about the Trump administration's response to the COVID pandemic. 



  • Politics, not Public Good, Will Guide what We Know about Trump’s Health

    by William I. Hitchcock

    "Should a president choose to hide crucial health details from the public, as Trump and his doctors have done, citizens have little recourse. All they can do is draw their own conclusions about the trustworthiness of the president."


  • "Follow the Science," but Explain and Apologize

    by Susan M. Reverby

    Governments need to establish trust so that their public health announcements are credible and persuasive, but have undermined that trust by conducting ethically questionable studies. A model of apology is part of the solution.