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technology



  • ‘On the Books’: Machine Learning Jim Crow

    by William Sturkey

    Lawyer and activist Pauli Murray undertook the arduous task of identifying racially discriminatory laws across the United States, and published a volume cataloguing them in 1950 as a took for attorneys working to dismantle Jim Crow. A University of North Carolina project uses technology to complete that task and demonstrate the historical pervasiveness of racism in the law.



  • Terror and Technology, From Dynamite to Drones (Review)

    Audrey Cronin's new book warns that terrorist networks are less likely to employ cutting-edge technology than to adapt widely-available tools to new destructive ends; security experts are still surprised by this repeating pattern. 



  • Not ‘Glorified Skype’

    The extensive labor required to develop new online courses or shift existing ones to a virtual or mixed delivery is not always obvious to higher ed critics. 



  • In the 1990s, Feminism Found a New Ally: Computers (excerpt)

    by Lisa Levenstein

    Few observers recognized that Edie Farwell’s group was part of a wide-ranging network of female technology specialists who were using the 1995 Beijing NGO conference to build the infrastructure for what would become online feminism.



  • The Last Days of the Tech Emperors?

    by Margaret O'Mara

    The mood of Congressional questioning of tech executives recalled the traffic safety debates of the mid-1960s that helped catalyze significantly more regulation for the auto industry.



  • Abraham Lincoln, Tech Entrepreneur

    by Sidney Blumenthal

    The president who created the National Academy of Sciences in 1863, Abraham Lincoln, did more to advance the scientific revolution in American life than any chief executive of the 19th century.



  • Why Filming Police Violence Has Done Nothing to Stop It

    The evidence suggests body cameras and other technological solutions to police violence are inadequate because the police are protected against consequences even if their misdeeds are recorded. 



  • The Coronavirus Could Rewrite the Rules for Silicon Valley

    by Margaret O'Mara

    The blue-collar workers who power the digital economy — including fulfillment center workers and app-based couriers — are pushing for higher pay and better protection, just as Detroit autoworkers did 90 years ago.