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Arts



  • Rethinking Who and What Get Memorialized

    The notion that history can be rewritten is a powerful one. It starts by taking the pen from the authors we’ve always had — and giving it to someone else.



  • Once Upon a Time, When America Paid Its Writers

    In Jason Boog’s new book, "The Deep End," he offers colorful and often grim profiles of nine Depression-era writers and connects their stories to the struggles that writers face today. Even before our current economic crisis, it was a depressingly apt comparison.



  • Pencil Leaners

    by Jeff Sparrow

    As Australia considers government support to artistic workers inspired by the US New Deal, important differences in context should be observed. 



  • Shakespeare Wrote His Best Works During a Plague

    by Daniel Pollack-Peltzner

    The most heartening lesson from Shakespeare’s era is that the playhouses will likely survive and reopen, again and again. What plays to perform when they do?



  • In a Lost Essay, a Glimpse of an Elusive Poet and Slave

    George Moses Horton's “Individual Influence” is interesting not just for his lofty, abstract words about the primacy of divine influence, but for the context in which they were preserved: in a scrapbook of material relating to a prominent scholar who was forced out of the university after publicly opposing slavery.